Simple System Monitoring for a Linux Desktop

The Problem

What exactly is eating into my HDD / processor / network right now??

Yeah! On the (Linux) desktop, we’d like to know why things crawl along sometimes. Which process(es) is the culprit behind that disk activity, or the memory hogger, or eating up network bandwidth?

Many tools exist that can help us pinpoint these facts. Sometimes, though, it’s just easier if someone shows us a quick easy way to get relevant facts; so here goes:

Continue reading Simple System Monitoring for a Linux Desktop

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A Header of Convenience

Over the years, we tend to collect little snippets of code and routines that we use, like, refine and reuse.

I’ve done so, for (mostly) user-space and kernel programming on the 2.6 / 3.x Linux kernel. Feel free to use it. Please do get back with any bugs you find, suggestions, etc.

License: GPL / LGPL

Click here to view the code!

There are macros / functions to:

  • make debug prints along with function name and line# info (via the usual printk() or trace_printk()) – (only if DEBUG mode is On)
    • [EDIT] : rate-limiting turned Off by default (else we risk missing some prints)
      -will preferably use rate-limited printk’sĀ 
  • dump the kernel-mode stack
  • print the current context (process or interrupt along with flags in the form that ftrace uses)
  • a simple assert() macro (!)
  • a cpu-intensive DELAY_LOOP (useful for test rigs that must spin on the processor)
  • an equivalent to usermode sleep functionality
  • a function to calculate the time delta given two timestamps (timeval structs)
  • convert decimal to binary, and
  • a few more.

Whew šŸ™‚

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Edit: removed the header listing inline here; it’s far more convenient to just view it online hereĀ (on ideone.com).
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