Category Archives: Misc

Linux Kernel Version Timeline

I wanted to quickly look up Linux kernel release dates by version number.

All the info is on kernelnewbies.org . I’ve just copied it below…

Click on the version # links (below) to see details of that version (redirects to the kernelnewbies website).

Source: http://kernelnewbies.org/LinuxVersions
Last Updated: 01 Apr 2016

4.x

Linux 4.5 Released 13 March, 2016 (63 days)

Linux 4.4 Released 10 January, 2016 (70 days)

Linux 4.3 Released 1 November, 2015 (63 days)

Linux 4.2 Released 30 August, 2015 (70 days)

Linux 4.1 Released 21 June, 2015 (70 days)

Linux 4.0 Released 12 April, 2015 (63 days)

3.x

Linux 3.19 Released 8 February, 2015 (63 days)

Linux 3.18 Released 7 December, 2014 (63 days)

Linux 3.17 Released 5 October, 2014 (63 days)

Linux 3.16 Released 3 August, 2014 (56 days)

Linux 3.15 Released 8 June, 2014 (70 days)

Linux 3.14 Released 30 March, 2014 (70 days)

Linux 3.13 Released 19 January, 2014 (78 days)

Linux 3.12 Released 2 November, 2013 (61 days)

Linux 3.11 Released 2 September, 2013 (64 days)

Linux 3.10 Released 30 June, 2013 (63 days)

Linux 3.9 Released 28 April, 2013 (69 days)

Linux 3.8 Released 18 February, 2013 70 ( days)

Linux 3.7 Released 10 December 2012 (71 days)

Linux 3.6 Released 30 September, 2012 (71 days)

Linux 3.5 Released 21 July, 2012 (62 days)

Linux 3.4 Released 20 May, 2012 (63 days)

Linux 3.3 Released 18 March, 2012 (74 days)

Linux 3.2 Released 4 January, 2012 (72 days)

Linux 3.1 Released 24 October, 2011 (95 days)

Linux 3.0 Released 21 July, 2011 (64 days)

2.6.x

Linux 2.6.39 Released 18 May, 2011 (65 days)

Linux 2.6.38 Released 14 March, 2011 (69 days)

Linux 2.6.37 Released 4 January, 2011 (76 days)

Linux 2.6.36 Released 20 October, 2010 (80 days)

Linux 2.6.35 Released 1 August, 2010 (76 days)

Linux 2.6.34 Released 16 May, 2010 (81 days)

Linux 2.6.33 Released 24 February, 2010 (83 days)

Linux 2.6.32 Released 3 December, 2009 (84 days)

Linux 2.6.31 Released 9 September, 2009 (92 days)

Linux 2.6.30 Released 9 June, 2009 (77 days)

Linux 2.6.29 Released 24 March, 2009 (89 days)

Linux 2.6.28 Released 25 December, 2008 (77 days)

Linux 2.6.27 Released 9 October, 2008 (88 days)

Linux 2.6.26 Released 13 July, 2008 (87 days)

Linux 2.6.25 Released 17 April, 2008 (84 days)

Linux 2.6.24 Released 24 January, 2008 (107 days)

Linux 2.6.23 Released 9 October, 2007 (93 days)

Linux 2.6.22 Released 8 July, 2007 (73 days)

Linux 2.6.21 Released 26 April, 2007 (80 days)

Linux 2.6.20 Released 5 February, 2007 (68 days)

Linux 2.6.19 Released 29 November, 2006 (70 days)

Linux 2.6.18 Released 20 September, 2006 (95 days)

Linux 2.6.17 Released 17 June, 2006 (88 days)

Linux 2.6.16 Released 20 March, 2006 (76 days)

Linux 2.6.15 Released 3 January, 2006 (68 days)

Linux 2.6.14 Released 27 October, 2005 (59 days)

Linux 2.6.13 Released 29 August, 2005 (73 days)

Linux 2.6.12 Released 17 June, 2005 (107 days)

Linux 2.6.11 Released 2 March, 2005 (68 days)

Linux 2.6.10 Released 24 December, 2004 (66 days)

Linux 2.6.9 Released 19 October, 2004 (66 days)

Linux 2.6.8 Released 14 August, 2004 (59 days)

Linux 2.6.7 Released 16 June, 2004 (37 days)

Linux 2.6.6 Released 10 May, 2004 (36 days)

Linux 2.6.5 Released 4 April, 2004 (24 days)

Linux 2.6.4 Released 11 March, 2004 (22 days)

Linux 2.6.3 Released 18 February, 2004 (14 days)

Linux 2.6.2 Released 4 February, 2004 (26 days)

Linux 2.6.1 Released 9 January, 2004 (22 days)

Linux 2.6.0 Released 18 December, 2003

Linux : 23 years on

Happy 23rd Linux !

Yes, 25 August 1991 is when Linus posted that (famous?) email…That email was sent on 25 August 1991; it’s exactly 23 years since then today!

"Hello everybody out there using minix -
I'm doing a (free) operating system (just a hobby, won't be big and
professional like gnu) for 386(486) AT clones. This has been brewing
since april, and is starting to get ready. ..."

(See the above link for the full text).

Here’s another post by Linus on Linux’s History.

“Some people have told me they don’t think a fat penguin really embodies the grace of Linux, which just tells me they have never seen an angry penguin charging at them in excess of 100 mph …”

Today, like everyday, it’s pretty much business-as-usual : the Linux OS gallops ahead on a smooth trajectory to “world domination” 
🙂
Thank you Linus and Linux : May you live and prosper a Googol years!

LINUX CHEATSHEET – vmstat, ps, top

LINUX Quick Reference Cheat Sheet

vmstat, ps, top


v 0.1 : Last Updated: March 2009 : <kaiwan at designergraphix dot com>
(c) kaiwan billimoria.

Much of the information below gleaned from various Linux man pages.

 

———————————————————-

vmstat

vmstat fields quick reference

The -a switch displays active/inactive memory, given a 2.5.41 kernel or better.
The -f switch displays the number of forks since boot. This includes the fork, vfork, and clone system calls, and is equivalent to the total number of tasks created. Each process is represented by one or more tasks, depending on thread usage. This display does not repeat.
The -m displays slabinfo.
The -n switch causes the header to be displayed only once rather than periodically.
The -s switch displays a table of various event counters and memory statistics. This display does not repeat.

delay is the delay between updates in seconds. If no delay is specified, only one report is printed with
the average values since boot.
count is the number of updates. If no count is specified and delay is defined, count defaults to infinity.

The -d reports disk statistics (2.5.70 or above required)
The -p followed by some partition name for detailed statistics (2.5.70 or above required)
The -S followed by k or K or m or M switches outputs between 1000, 1024, 1000000, or 1048576 bytes
The -V switch results in displaying version information.

FIELD DESCRIPTION FOR VM MODE

Procs

r: The number of processes waiting for run time << ready-to-run >>.
b: The number of processes in uninterruptible sleep << blocked >>.

Memory << (default) in kilobytes >>
swpd: the amount of virtual memory used.

free: the amount of idle memory.
buff: the amount of memory used as buffers.
cache: the amount of memory used as cache << page cache, not incl. swap cache>> .
inact: the amount of inactive memory. (-a option)
active: the amount of active memory. (-a option)

Swap << in kilobytes/second >>

si: Amount of memory swapped in from disk (/s).
so: Amount of memory swapped to disk (/s).
 Continue reading LINUX CHEATSHEET – vmstat, ps, top